A Good Read

LawyersIsn’t law school great?  You get to read tons of stuff about stuff you didn’t know about until you started reading.  Problem is, law students often get so bogged down with reading stuff for classes that they fail to notice little else – unless, of course, someone happens to “nudge” them to read something else.

Today’s nudge relates to the Women Trailblazers in the Law website.  Seems Stanford Law School’s Robert Crown Law Library has launched a new site for the American Bar Association’s (ABA) oral history project entitled “Women Trailblazers in the Law” (WTP).  The website offers open access to the oral histories of close to 100 senior women who have made important contributions to the law and have opened opportunities for other women in the profession.  As the the website states:

[the WTP project] captures the oral histories of women pioneers in the legal profession nationwide, memorializing their stories in their own voices and preserving their experiences and observations for future generations.

In addition to the obvious notable selections of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Janet Reno are a number women I had never heard of including:

Curious to discover more?  I know I was and have enjoyed reading and hearing the stories of these strong women.  So, why not take a few minutes out of your day and get acquainted with some serious history?

You’ll be glad you did.

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Spooooky, Isn’t It?

GutHave you ever had that feeling that something is just not right?  Or maybe you should be doing something that you are not presently doing or that you should be looking up (or down)?  Call it a spider senses or that third eye thing but sometimes when you’re thinking about something you start to see signs all around you that maybe – just – that you should pay attention?

Like that guy behind you that has been honking for the last 5 miles and you discover when you get out at the next red light with the intent to give him a piece of your mind and a four knuckle massage, that the reason he was honking was not to annoy you (well, maybe a little) but because he was trying to tell you that you had left your Grande, Iced, Sugar-Free, Vanilla Latte with Soy Milk on the roof of your car.  Oops.

Or maybe it was your dog that was barking all night until 2 in the morning and when you finally go out to see what in blazes he was barking at you run into the prowler who had been casing your place and was just about to make his move into your house.

Or maybe it was the email your boss sent you about E-Discovery Day, that you “overlooked,” but and as you were perusing the stacks in the library, you looked up and saw gobs of resources on and about all things e-discovery.

Wait, what?!  Back up a bit…what in blazes is all this about E-Discovery Day?  As it turns out, E-Discovery (i.e. electronic discovery) Day celebrates e-discovery’s vital and growing role in the legal process and it is becoming a pretty big thing.

Sure it is!

Traditionally it is celebrated on December 1.  This year, however, since E-Discovery Day falls on a Saturday, supporters are changing the date to December 4 (guess too many supporters were opting to watch football or something) and a whole lot of organizations are going to town hosting events that celebrate all things E-Discovery.

For example, the International Legal Technology Association will be hosting webcasts covering a variety of e-discovery topics.  Interested persons can register at https://www.e-discoveryday.com/webcasts for an online experience or, if they like, persons can participate in person by registering at https://www.e-discoveryday.com/in-person-events.

Maybe you’d rather just curl up with a good book and read up on all things e-discovery?  If so, might I suggest you take a gander at:

  • Electronic Discovery and Records information Management Guide: rules, checklists and forms (Thomson Reuters)
  • Litigation Readiness: a practical approach to electronic discovery>/abbr> (Oxford)
  • The Ethics of E-Discovery (ABA)
  • Managing E-Discovery and ESI: from pre-litigation through trail (ABA)
  • eDiscovery Response Planning: a guide for corporate legal departments (Lexis)

Yep, pretty spooky when you’re doing something and your gut is telling you that you should be doing (or looking for) something else.  Maybe next time, it might be best to pay attention to those promptings before you have to read a blog that tells you what you already know?

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Articles Worth Reading

Authored by Cassandra Patterson, Reference & Outreach Services Librarian

book stack

For your information needs and reading pleasure, check out the following articles:

  1. Why It’s So Hard to Stop Reading Books You Don’t Even Like;
  2. The Key to Preventing Generational Tension Is Remembering That Everyone Wants to Feel Valued;
  3. FCC Adopts Controversial Rules on Handling Consumer Complaints;
  4. Judge Orders L.A. Times to Alter Story About Glendale Cop, Sparking Protest From Newspaper;
  5. SCOTUS Goes Online;
  6. Where Does Happiness Reside in the Brain?;
  7. How to Recover a Lost or Misplaced File on Your Computer;
  8. 3 Better Ways to Say “It’s Actually Not My Fault”;
  9. A New Retirement Risk: Unclaimed Property Laws; and
  10. Make Time to Hear and See.

Happy reading!

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Recommended Resources: Medical Evidence in South Carolina Court

Recommended Resources

–Top Picks of Advanced Legal Research Students–

Recommended Resources is a recurring blog that features the top picks of print and electronic resources available in the Charleston School of Law Library as selected by the Spring 2018 Advanced Legal Research students.

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LEARN EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT USING MEDICAL EVIDENCE AND MEDICAL EXPERT TESTIMONY IN SOUTH CAROLINA COURTS!

The resource titled Medical Evidence in South Carolina Court: Your Guide to Effective Use is an essential piece of material for anyone interested in learning more about how medical evidence or medical expert testimony is used in South Carolina courts.

This resource covers all aspects of medical evidence, including:

  • Retrieving medical records;
  • Identifying and understanding the records;
  • Incorporating the records into trial preparation;
  • Choosing and qualifying a medical expert to testify;
  • Preparing the expert before trial;
  • Practical uses of medical evidence and how it can make or break your case; and
  • Ethical considerations when using medical evidence.

For anyone going into practice that will be dealing with medical evidence and medical expert testimony, this resource is a MUST HAVE.  It lays the foundation on all the essential tips and tricks surrounding medical evidence and medical expert testimony.  This resource can be used by seasoned and experienced attorneys, as well as brand new attorneys.  You can never know too much about the area of medical evidence during the course of litigation.

Medical Evidence in South Carolina Court: Your Guide to Effective Use is available in our library in print.

By Jeffrey Domanico.

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Library Closed July 4, 2018

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The Sol Blatt Jr. Law Library, along with the Charleston School of Law, will be closed on Wednesday, July 4, 2018 in honor of Independence Day.  The library will re-open on Thursday, July 5th, resuming regular operating hours.

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Articles Worth Reading

Authored by Cassandra Patterson, Reference & Outreach Services Librarian

articles-worth-readingdownload-google-books-free

For your reading pleasure and information needs, check out the following articles:

  1. Smarter, Not Harder: How to Succeed at Work;
  2. An Inventory of Court + Public Self-Help Websites;
  3. 10 Habits of Incredibly Happy People;
  4. In Survey, Judges Say Lawyers’ Incomplete Research Impacts Case Outcomes;
  5. How to Discover Your Career Superpower;
  6. Understanding the Problem that Comes with the Solution;
  7. After Mother’s Death, 2 Charleston Brothers Struggle to Make Her Proud;
  8. Supporting a Friend or Co-Worker Suffering From Stress;
  9. How Does Online Access to Court Records in Your State Compare?; and
  10. Tips for Reading the Room Before a Meeting or Presentation.

Happy reading!

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Recommended Resources: Dealing With A Rambo Litigator in Divorce

Recommended Resources

–Top Picks of Advanced Legal Research Students–

Recommended Resources is a recurring blog that features the top picks of print and electronic resources available in the Charleston School of Law Library as selected by the Spring 2018 Advanced Legal Research students.

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How to Combat Rambo Litigators Without Compromising Ethics: See Dealing With A Rambo Litigator in Divorce

In every practice area, there will be that “very aggressive” lawyer who will be encountered. Dealing With A Rambo Litigator in Divorce is the perfect guide detailing how to deal with “those” types of attorneys in divorce proceedings. This source was written by Natalie Bluestein and was published by the National Business Institute. This source may easily be found in the South Carolina section of the Charleston School of Law library.

Dealing With A Rambo Litigator in Divorce sets out the types of tactics these litigators will use in an attempt to win their case. This source details the mindset of the litigator and the tactics these lawyers will be likely to use.

While it may seem like this is a “how to guide” on becoming a Rambo yourself, it also lays out how to combat these tactics ethically and quickly. The source lays out specific tricks that need to be looked out for, practical tactics for dealing with the litigator, and procedural remedies. It also emphasizes how being a Rambo litigator can be detrimental to your client.

This source has two important features:

First, it sets out specific instances that will likely occur with Rambo litigators and details how to respond. Specifically, it explains how to respond to the Rambo’s likely burdensome discovery, and even how to schedule with them so that they do not always call the shots.

Second, it gives South Carolina rules of procedure to help with dealing with the Rambo. This source gives specific rules to follow so that the Rambo’s tactics are not successful, and you do not face any ethical problems.

Even if you do not encounter a Rambo litigator in the family courts, this source can be a helpful guide to tame any Rambo litigator.

By English Maull

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