Researching Foreign or Comparative Law? Click here for FREE Online Access to the “Bible” of Foreign Law!

FLGThe Foreign Law Guide (FLG) was originally created by Thomas H. Reynolds and Arturo A. Flores and it is commonly referred to as “Reynolds & Flores.” Brill, a Netherlands based publisher, recently took over the electronic database in 2012. Behind the scenes, and the reason why FLG is successful with its annually updated information, is a team composed of global experts.

This database is FREE for all Charleston School of Law students and can be found at the following link, located on the Charleston School of Law Sol. Blott Jr. Law Library database webpage: http://charlestonlaw.edu/sol-blatt-jr-law-library/databases-and-catalog/.

The FLG Includes:

  • Approximately 190 Jurisdictions
  • Background Information on Legal System & History
  • Outline of Judicial & Legislative System
  • Primary and Secondary Sources of Law
  • Major Legal Publications & Online Resources
  • Citations

What I like most about this research guide, is the ease of navigation. FLG is organized by four main pages to help guide you toward the type of information you are seeking. The four main pages include: countries; laws by subject; materials indexed; and about foreign law guide. Each country’s main page is organized by an A-Z arrangement of sources of law by subject.

There are approximately 66 listed subjects. FLG has edited these listed subjects and has made them more broad in order to make browsing the most effective. Additionally, FLG provides a video user guide, which includes tips for browsing. The only drawback about this particular research database is that it does not always provide English translations of the text. However, when dealing with foreign law, that is to be expected. FLG will usually provide links of sources that are English translated.

I truly believe time is not wasted when browsing this resource. The team behind FLG has taken its time ensuring that. Check it out!

Maria Skermo
Class of 2019

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